*** TRAFFIC ALERT *** MDOT SHA TO CLOSE MD 273 (TELEGRAPH ROAD) BRIDGE OVER BIG ELK CREEK IN CECIL COUNTY NEXT WEEK

MD 273 sign

MD 273 sign)

​(August 27, 2020) – The Maryland Department of Transportation State Highway Administration (MDOT SHA) will close the MD 273 (Telegraph Road) bridge over Big Elk Creek in Cecil County on Wednesday, Sept. 2. and Thursday, Sept. 3. The closure will take place from 3 a.m. to 8 a.m. both days and will enable crews to place concrete for a section of park trail at the bridge. Detour signs will be posted and motorists can use MD 316 (Appleton Road), MD 279 (Elkton Road) and MD 213 (Singerly Road).   

The concrete work is part of MDOT SHA’s $6.7 million project to replace the MD 273 bridge spanning Big Elk Creek and reconstruct a section of the popular hiker/biker/equestrian trail under the bridge in the 5,600-acre Fair Hill Natural Resources Management Area. Learn more about the project HERE.    

Additional MD 273 closures may be needed in September to complete the trail work and set the remaining concrete girders for the new bridge. MDOT SHA will alert the public as those dates become available. The trail will reopen to park users by late September; completion of the new bridge is expected by late fall.   

MDOT SHA works hard to maintain safe traffic mobility in work zones for our crews as well as our customers. Drivers need to stay alert, focus on driving, and look for reduced speed limits as well as other driving pattern changes. Drive like you work here and slow down in construction zones.

For a list of all major MDOT SHA projects, go to Project Portal. Visit our homepage at roads.maryland.gov. For a look at real-time traffic conditions, go to md511.maryland.gov.

Editor’s Note

From intersection improvements to widening and new interchange construction, MDOT SHA is investing in projects to enhance the commute and daily travel for millions of Marylanders.  MDOT SHA maintains more than 2,500 bridges and 17,000 miles of non-toll state roads – the interstate, US and state numbered routes in Maryland’s 23 counties.

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